Criminal Justice

Rob Roth
INSTRUCTOR

email: rroth@rowanty.us

Industry

Criminal justice encompasses a wide variety of careers, all focused toward the goal of public safety and seeking justice. Many of these careers require physically fit and mentally acute laborers to perform under strenuous circumstances. There are also career choices which may require less physical activity, but no less mental acuity. Additionally, some career choices have age requirements (such as police officers) or other education requirements (such as lawyers) which must be met in order to obtain a position in that career.

Jobs

There are a vast number of career options in the criminal justice system. Becoming security, corrections, or police officers, private investigators, dispatch and emergency response teams, and legal professionals are just a few of the paths which can be chosen when studying criminal justice. Salaries vary greatly depending on the job and level of education one chooses to attain.

What can you expect from the Criminal Justice I & II courses?

The Criminal Justice program at the Rowanty Technical Center introduces the student to the three major components of the Criminal Justice System: law enforcement, courts and corrections. The program is designed to prepare students for immediate employment upon graduation in the areas of private security, corrections, and emergency communications (9-1-1 operations).  Students with an interest in law enforcement will receive appropriate training in the program, but will be restricted by age requirements in most law enforcement careers. Students with interests in community corrections (probation officer) or the legal community (attorney) will receive a proper foundation of education and training, but will have to continue their education in a college programs to meet that employment requirement of these career choices.

Rowanty Technical Center’s Criminal Justice program is a two-year, four semester program offering dual enrollment with John Tyler Community College. Qualified students will have the opportunity to earn up to 12 college credits over the two years of the program. Beyond earning college credits, the Criminal Justice Program at Rowanty will provide an opportunity to learn, practice, and apply tactical training in the three major branches of the American Criminal Justice System: law enforcement, courts, and corrections. Included in this training environment will be traffic stops, fingerprinting, crime scene investigations, handcuffing, basic defensive tactics, room & building searches, cell extraction, and the steps in a criminal trial. Students will also have the opportunity to earn their OSHA 10-Hour General Industry Safety card and become certified in CPR/AED & First Aid. The program is designed to begin developing the student’s foundation of knowledge of the American Criminal Justice System and better prepare the student for a career in criminal justice and continuing their education at the post-secondary level.

First Year:

Survey of Criminal Justice: This introductory course presents an overview of the United States criminal justice system; introduces the major system components–law enforcement, courts, and corrections.
Constitutional Law: This course surveys the basic guarantees of liberty described in the U.S. Constitution and the historical development of these restrictions on government power primarily through U.S. Supreme Court decisions.  Reviews rights of free speech, press, assembly, as well as criminal procedure guarantees and protections (counsel, jury trial, search and seizure, self-incrimination, etc.) as they apply to the activities of those in the criminal justice system.

Second Year:

Criminal Law, Evidence and Procedures: This course teaches the elements of proof for major and common crimes and the legal classification of offenses.  Studies the kinds, degrees and admissibility of evidence its presentation in criminal proceedings with emphasis on legal guidelines for methods and techniques of evidence acquisition.  Surveys the procedural requirements from arrest to final disposition in the various American court systems with focus on the Virginia jurisdiction.
Law Enforcement Organization and Administration: This course teaches the principles of organization and administration of law enforcement agencies. It includes the studies the management of line operations, staff and auxiliary services, investigative and juvenile units. Introduces the concept of data processing; examines policies, procedures, rules and regulations pertaining to crime prevention. The course also encompasses surveys concepts of protection of life and property, detection of offenses and apprehension of offenders.

Criminal Justice I & II Syllabus

The Criminal Justice I and II courses each contain two parts. Each syllabus contains a unique Course Description, Course Objectives, and Course Text section, followed by sections common to all four syllabi. Click the heading below to expand each class syllabus.

Criminal Justice I

Survey of Criminal Justice

Course Description

Presents an overview of the United States criminal justice system; introduces the major system components–law enforcement, judiciary, and corrections.

Course Objectives

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to do the following:

  • Describe the origins and features of our law enforcement system, including what systems of law enforcement were brought to and developed in America
  • Understand the basic roles of patrol officers and investigators
  • Understand how the police relate to other components of the criminal justice system
  • Explain where police get their power and authority and what restrictions are placed on their actions
  • Summarize the law enforcement code of ethics
  • Understand the impact of criminal law on the community
  • Describe legal constraints and Constitutional protections in the criminal justice system
  • Summarize the development of the American court system
  • Describe the criminal trial process
  • Understand criminal sentencing models and options to traditional sentencing
  • Describe the history, purpose, and characteristics of probation and parole
  • Describe the purpose and history of the prison system and the problems facing prisons today
  • Describe the evolution of the juvenile justice system and its role in modern criminal justice
  • Describe the future of the criminal justice system

Students will also be provided the opportunity to participate in criminal justice related physical & tactical training. Students will be encouraged to participate. Those students who choose not to participate will not receive participation credit for the day. Medical documentation will be necessary to opt out physical and tactical training.

Course Text

Gaines, Larry K.; Miller, Roger LeRoy. (2018). CJ5. Cengage Learning. ISBN-13: 978-1-285-46048-2

Additional References

Schmallager, F. (2011). Criminal Justice Today: An introductory text for the 21st century. 11th Ed. Pearson. ISBN-13: 978-0-13-507409-1

Law Enforcement Organization & Administration

Course Description

This course teaches the principles of organization and administration of law enforcement agencies. It includes the studies the management of line operations, staff and auxiliary services, investigative and juvenile units. Introduces the concept of data processing; examines policies, procedures, rules and regulations pertaining to crime prevention. The course also encompasses surveys concepts of protection of life and property, detection of offenses and apprehension of offenders.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course of study, students should be able to:

  • Reviews the organization and mission of policing in the United States.
  • Comprehend management supervision and leadership in law enforcement.
  • Communicates critical management skills involving decision making and problem solving.
  • Analyze staffing measures, hiring, training and professional development.
  • Understand the methods used in human resources management, research and planning.
  • Understanding leadership skills regarding discipline and problem behavior while analyzing policy and procedural methods to address this issue.
  • Understanding budgeting and management costs creativity.
  • Understand how to measure performance assessments and evaluations.
  • Analysis of the framework involved in the design of future technology as it relates to law enforcement organization and administration.

Students will also be provided the opportunity to participate in criminal justice related physical & tactical training. Students will be encouraged to participate. Those students who choose not to participate will not receive participation credit for the day. Medical documentation will be necessary to opt out physical and tactical training.

Text

Hess, K.M., Hess-Orthman, C. Ladue, S. (2015). Management and Supervision in Law Enforcement, 7th Ed. Cengage Learning, Boston MA. 02210

Criminal Justice II

Criminal Law, Evidence, & Procedures

Course Description

Teaches the elements of proof for major and common crimes and the legal classification of offenses. Studies the kinds, degrees and admissibility of evidence its presentation in criminal proceedings with emphasis on legal guidelines for methods and techniques of evidence acquisition. Surveys the procedural requirements from arrest to final disposition in the various American court systems with a focus on the Virginia jurisdiction.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course of study, students should be able to:

  • Define Law
  • Define moral and legal responsibilities.
  • Define jurisdictions
  • Define criminal intent
  • Define homicide
  • Define assault
  • Define rape
  • Define larceny
  • Define robbery
  • Define burglary
  • Define arson
  • Define forgery
  • Describe false arrest and imprisonment
  • Describe drug laws
  • Define juvenile traffic offenses
  • Describe perjury

Students will also be provided the opportunity to participate in criminal justice related physical & tactical training. Students will be encouraged to participate. Those students who choose not to participate will not receive participation credit for the day. Medical documentation will be necessary to opt out physical and tactical training.

Course Text

Worrall, L. and Moore, J. (2015). Criminal law and procedure. 14 ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc. ISBN: 9782375771

Constitutional Law for the Criminal Justice Professional

Course Description

Surveys the basic guarantees of liberty described in the U.S. Constitution and the historical development of these restrictions on government power primarily through U.S. Supreme Court decisions. Reviews rights of free speech, press, assembly, as well as criminal procedure guarantees and protections (counsel, jury trial, search and seizure, self-incrimination, etc.) as they apply to the activities of those in the criminal justice system.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course of study, students should be able to:

  • Understand the history, structure, and content of the United States Constitution
  • Understand freedom of speech
  • Understand authority to detain and arrest; use of force
  • Understand search and seizure.
  • Understand eavesdropping and interception of communication
  • Understand interrogations and confessions
  • Define self-incrimination
  • Understand the right to counsel
  • Describe trial and punishment
  • Understand federal, criminal, and civil remedies for unconstitutional conduct
  • Describe constitutional and civil rights in the government work place.

Students will also be provided the opportunity to participate in criminal justice related physical & tactical training. Students will be encouraged to participate. Those students who choose not to participate will not receive participation credit for the day. Medical documentation will be necessary to opt out physical and tactical training.

Course Text

Kanovitz, J. (2015). Constitutional Law for Criminal Justice, 14th Ed. Routledge: New York, NY.

Additional References

Kanovitz, J. (2010). Constitutional Law for Criminal Justice, 12th Ed. Lexis Nexis: New Providence, NJ.

The following sections are common to the Criminal Justice I and Criminal Justice II courses.

Criminal Justice - General

Course Requirements

Students’ course grades will be based upon the following assessments and activities:

  • Exams: Students will take a first semester exam and a final exam.
  • Written Assessments: Quizzes, tests and other writing assignments will be used at the instructor’s discretion to test the students on information throughout the course.
  • Participation: This includes being prepared and engaged in the classroom and participating in the skills/practical exercises.
  • Current Events and Key Terms: Students will keep a journal on current events in criminal justice and important vocabulary words and definitions.
  • Projects: Several class projects will be introduced during the semester.
  • Skills/Practical Exercises: Students will participate in various training exercises that will be graded based upon their successfully completion.
  • Extra Credit: There will be opportunities for students to earn extra credit.

Exams (Exam Exemption Policy)

  1. No student will be exempt from mid-term exams.
  2. There are no exam exemptions for 1st year programs. For one year, 2nd semester of cluster, and two year programs, students must have a minimum of 80/B (by the administrative cut-off date), students must have passed their industry certification and students may not have more than 6 unexcused absences for the year to receive an exam exemption for the end of the year.
  3. Attendance – If a student is absent for the exam on the date that it is given, the student will have to produce a legal note to administration to be able to take the exam.
  4. If the student is suspended on the date of the exam, the student will receive a 0/F for the exam, which is 20% of the student’s semester grade.

Grading Categories and Weights:

Quarter
Written Assessments
Projects
Skills Assessments
Participation
35%
20%
35%
10%
Semester 1 / 2
Quarter 1 / 3
Quarter 2 / 4
Exam 1 / 2
40%
40%
20%
Year
Semester 1
Semester 2
50%
50%

GRADING SCALE

A     90 – 100
B     80 – 89
C     70 – 79
D     60 – 69
F     Below 60

Academic Integrity

All students are expected to adhere to the institution’s policy addressing academic integrity. All forms of dishonesty, including cheating, plagiarism, knowingly furnishing false information, forgery, and the alteration of college documents constitutes violations of the Student Conduct Code. Such violations may result in the assignment of a grade of “F” for the test, quiz, and/or course in which the act of academic dishonesty was committed, as well as suspension or dismissal from the program or institution.

Make-up Policy

Make-up work is scheduled to be completed within 5 days of an absence, or missed works due date. Quizzes or tests that need to be made up due to absence will take place upon the student’s return to school.

Late Work

Failure to turn in the required work will result in a grade of zero for the assignment. Late work will be accepted with a 10% deduction for each class day the assignment is late.

School Closings

Please refer to the Rowanty Technical Center Academic Calendar and your home school’s calendar for school closings and holiday breaks.

Student Conduct

The Rowanty Technical Center Handbook provides a complete description of school rules, policies, and expectations. For example:

Specific apparel is required for programs within the Technical Center by the nature of the work to be performed as well as by State and/or local policy. Students will be advised of these requirements at the beginning of the school year and will be given a reasonable amount of time to procure the needed items (two weeks from opening). Closed toe shoes should be worn at all times at Rowanty Technical Center, including the classroom. Bedroom shoes should not be worn at Rowanty Technical Center for any reason. Additionally, students must wear appropriate protective equipment when performing hazardous operations. The protective equipment includes safety glasses/shields and may include gloves, aprons, hard hats, etc.

Materials and Equipment

The recommended uniform and the required materials & equipment will be addressed in a separate document.

General Class Procedures

  1. Students should be prepared for class immediately upon their arrival to Rowanty.
  2. Permission must be granted if students wish to use the restroom or use the water fountain.
  3. Class notes will be taken during the lecture portion of the class. Notes may also be required during the viewing of any supporting video.
  4. Full participation will be expected when we are working outside or in the training center.

Class Rules

  1. Respect one another and all faculty and staff members.
  2. Respect the equipment, materials, computers, and the school.
  3. Request permission before using any of the equipment/technology in the classroom or shop.
  4. Request permission before printing out any materials.
  5. Students will be responsible for their personal property. Locks and lockers will be assigned to each student.
  6. Students will not share lockers or share locker combinations.
  7. Students will adhere to the policies provided in the Rowanty Student Handbook.
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